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 The Casuist - and another book. 
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Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2007 3:42 am
Posts: 739
Location: Moscow, Idaho, U.S.A.
New post The Casuist - and another book.
I am sure that our beloved moderator, Mr. Lane, is extremely busy, but I have been looking forward with eager anticipation to another problem from the above, and I imagine that there are others who are feeling as I am.

In the meantime, I have been closely reading Fr. Dominic Prummer's Handbook of Moral Theology and am discovering more and more items of intense interest therein.

I am continually amazed, and grateful to God, for the common sense which is inherent in the teachings of the Catholic Church. It is all so common-sensical and down-to-earth! I have read that one of the very obvious characteristics of the saints was that "...they were full of common-sense."

We also recently, after much difficulty finding it, received through our local Interlibrary Loan, an exact facsimile copy of another book written by Fr. Gregory Martin and published in 1582 or so, concerning the "...manifold corruptions of the sacred scriptures by the heretikes of our daies...". This book is extremely interesting! Fr. Martin, whose name is prominently connected with the ORIGINAL Douay-Rheims translations of the bible, published around 450 years ago, is an extremely "pathetic" writer, and easily holds one's interest.

As I have time, I intend to copy, scan, and OCR this book and make it available as a PDF.

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Kenneth G. Gordon CinC
Moscow, Idaho
U.S.A.


Thu Oct 04, 2007 4:46 pm
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Good work, Ken. I love The Casuist, also, and am eager for more. And it would be wonderful to get the old Fr.Martin material.


Fri Oct 05, 2007 12:27 pm

Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2007 3:42 am
Posts: 739
Location: Moscow, Idaho, U.S.A.
New post More from that "other book".
Below is a section from the book by Fr. Gregory Martin, A Discoverie of the Manifold corruptions of the Holy Scriptures by the Heretikes of our daies..., published in 1582, which is still apropos to our discussions with the Protestants 425 years after it was first published.

This section is one of many which concern the Protestant mistranslation of certain Greek and Hebrew words and phrases. I hope that some of you will get as much enjoyment out of it as I do. By the way, I have written it in more modern English, as the English of 1582 is somewhat difficult to read. At the end of this section, I will attempt to reproduce the early English so you can see what it looks like:

“I beseech you, what is the next and readiest and most proper English of idolum, idolatra, idololatria ?Is it not idol, idolater, idolatry ? Are not these plain English words, and well known in our language? Why sought you further for other terms and words, if you had meant faithfully [to translate]? What needed that circumstance of three words for one, worshiper of images, and worshiping of images ? Whether (I pray you) is the more natural and convenient speech, either in our English tongue, or for the truth of the thing, to say as the Holy Scripture does, covetousness is idolatry, and consequently, The covetous man is an idolater : or as you translate, covetousness is worshiping of images, and, The covetous man is a worshiper of images. ?
We say commonly in English, “Such a rich man makes his money his God”: and the Apostle says in like manner of some, “…whose belly is their God.” (Phil. 3), and generally every creature is our idol, when we esteem it so exceedingly that we make it our God. But who ever heard in English that our money, or our belly, were our images and that by esteeming them too much, we become worshipers of images.”

Here is a short example of the old English:

“…vvhether (I pray you) is the more natural & conuenient ſpeach, either in our Engliſh tõgue, or for the truth of the thing, to ſay as the holie Scripture doth, …”

For instance, the letter “s” looks exactly like our letter “f”, except that there is no short horizonatl bar crossing the vertical part. Also, the printer had no letter “w” so he used two letter “v” together. Combinations of letters which include the letter “n”, i.e. ...ion, ...on..., etc, are rendered with an apostrophe after the vowel, and many words we use today such as “Paul’s”, and “words” are rendered as “wordes” and “Paules”, while certain other few words have no direct counterpart in modern English at all.

Nevertheless, the subject matter, and its discussion is valuable yet today, and Fr. Martin covers it in detail with considrable humor, laced with gentle sarcasm.

God Bless him. I think that if I get to Heaven, one of those I will wish to see and converse with will be him. :)

[Edit: modified the Old English]

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Kenneth G. Gordon CinC
Moscow, Idaho
U.S.A.


Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:12 pm
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