It is currently Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:51 pm




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
 Theology Manuals/Other books 
Author Message

Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 1:54 am
Posts: 147
New post Theology Manuals/Other books
I'm sure this is a much easier question to ask than it is to answer but I'm going to try anyways. I had the naive belief that sedevacantism was much easier to understand and explain and honestly, quite simple. Mr. Lane, your comment in another thread about how people can often become sedevacantists moreso due to a lack of understanding in regard to Catholic teaching and law I'm sure applies to myself.

I'm quite sure that I will never get a full grasp of how this whole thing can be most adequately explained in an orthodox manner, but I would like to give it the best shot I can.

That said, I know that in order to get a good grasp of things one needs to have a common knowledge of the manuals of the theologians. I have read a good deal on the problems of Vatican II and the (anti)-popes and the new mass. But I haven't gone into too much depth yet in regards to the theologians. I have a work by Ludwig Ott and I have Heribert Jone's "Moral Theology" but that's all I've had a chance to purchase or read thusfar.

My question is, in your (meaning anybody here) mind what is the best, and possibly most thorough, list of theology manuals and other books that one should read in order to get a good grasp of the issues surrounding the crisis, and also just a good grasp on theology and canon law. I am not proficient in any other language but English at the moment but do hope to learn Latin at some point in my life, so don't let language be a barrier to the list. Thank you.


Mon Sep 03, 2007 7:25 am
Profile

Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2007 3:42 am
Posts: 740
Location: Moscow, Idaho, U.S.A.
New post Re: Theology Manuals/Other books
Colin Fry wrote:
My question is, in your (meaning anybody here) mind what is the best, and possibly most thorough, list of theology manuals and other books that one should read in order to get a good grasp of the issues surrounding the crisis, and also just a good grasp on theology and canon law.


I have the same questions.

However, as I mentioned on another thread, I have always been somewhat afraid of reading too much about Canon Law since I have known a number of people, both men and women, who have, essentially, read themselves out of the Church by attempting to interpret Canon Law without proper guidance.

And since I don't know of any source for laymen to obtain such "proper guidance", I have been, literally, afraid to read much on Canon Law for fear that I would fall into the same type of error.

Books on Moral Theology, per se, MIGHT be a different matter, since those I have read so far are very logcial, reasonable, and matter-of-fact about those matters.

In fact, my most recent acquisition, Prummer's Moral Theology is absolutely fascinating reading, and most of what I have read there, so far, contains eminiently practical information.

By the way, I think you have to be somewhat careful of Ott's book in its English translation: it contains subtle errors in certain places. Overall, however, it is excellent. Don't take this warning to extremes though. I may be wrong. So far, I haven't found any OBVIOUS errors. In any case, as I understand it, those errors are in the English translation, NOT in the original German.

If I had $10,000, I could have the original German properly translated by my sister, who has a Master's degree in German and does translating.

_________________
Kenneth G. Gordon CinC
Moscow, Idaho
U.S.A.


Mon Sep 03, 2007 8:48 pm
Profile E-mail
Site Admin

Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 2:30 pm
Posts: 4334
New post 
Ideally, you'd find a teacher to guide you through the study of such matters. Any priest might agree to an hour or two a week if you showed yourself docile and enthusiastic. Even a very average priest, intellectually speaking, would be better than a complete self-teaching exercise.

Wilhelm & Scannell, "Manual of Catholic Theology"
Hunter, S.J. "Outlines of Dogmatic Theology"
Van Noort, "Dogmatic Theology"
Pohl-Preuss, "Dogmatic Theology"
Berry, "The Church"
Mura, "The Nature of the Mystical Body"
Glenn, "Apologetics" (plus his series on various branches of philosophy is invaluable)
The papal encyclicals
St. Thomas, "Summa Theologica" - transl. by the Fathers of the English Dominican Province

_________________
In Christ our King.


Mon Sep 03, 2007 10:18 pm
Profile E-mail
Site Admin

Joined: Tue May 16, 2006 2:30 pm
Posts: 4334
New post Re: Theology Manuals/Other books
KenGordon wrote:
However, as I mentioned on another thread, I have always been somewhat afraid of reading too much about Canon Law since I have known a number of people, both men and women, who have, essentially, read themselves out of the Church by attempting to interpret Canon Law without proper guidance.

And since I don't know of any source for laymen to obtain such "proper guidance", I have been, literally, afraid to read much on Canon Law for fear that I would fall into the same type of error.


Canon Law is extremely difficult. Without a competent teacher only the most highly intelligent person with a particular type of mind could hope to get very far. I do however think that reading through the Canons, as paraphrased by Woywod or Bouscaren & Ellis, is invaluable. All learning is useful if it can inspire a knowledge of one's ignorance and feelings of awe towards the sublime wisdom of the Church. I think a reading of the Canons will do both.

On moral theology the best book in English that I have found is McHugh & Callan, revised and enlarged by Walter Farrell, O.P. It is two large volumes, very comprehensive, very balanced. Beautiful.

_________________
In Christ our King.


Mon Sep 03, 2007 10:28 pm
Profile E-mail

Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 1:54 am
Posts: 147
New post Re: Theology Manuals/Other books
KenGordon wrote:
I have the same questions.

However, as I mentioned on another thread, I have always been somewhat afraid of reading too much about Canon Law since I have known a number of people, both men and women, who have, essentially, read themselves out of the Church by attempting to interpret Canon Law without proper guidance.

And since I don't know of any source for laymen to obtain such "proper guidance", I have been, literally, afraid to read much on Canon Law for fear that I would fall into the same type of error.

Books on Moral Theology, per se, MIGHT be a different matter, since those I have read so far are very logcial, reasonable, and matter-of-fact about those matters.

In fact, my most recent acquisition, Prummer's Moral Theology is absolutely fascinating reading, and most of what I have read there, so far, contains eminiently practical information.


Definitely agree on this and one certainly needs to be careful. I went through what I believed was just such an occasion when I left the Novus Ordo. For a short time I was very stressed out thinking I had done just as you say, read myself out of the Church. Now I'm confident that is not the case but I know what it feels like.

Quote:
By the way, I think you have to be somewhat careful of Ott's book in its English translation: it contains subtle errors in certain places. Overall, however, it is excellent. Don't take this warning to extremes though. I may be wrong. So far, I haven't found any OBVIOUS errors. In any case, as I understand it, those errors are in the English translation, NOT in the original German.

If I had $10,000, I could have the original German properly translated by my sister, who has a Master's degree in German and does translating.


I have heard this from a couple of people and try to be careful. I wonder if having a number of manuals on hand in which I can compare would be useful...


Tue Sep 04, 2007 12:29 am
Profile

Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 1:54 am
Posts: 147
New post 
John Lane wrote:
Ideally, you'd find a teacher to guide you through the study of such matters. Any priest might agree to an hour or two a week if you showed yourself docile and enthusiastic. Even a very average priest, intellectually speaking, would be better than a complete self-teaching exercise.


Absolutely and I hope that I could find such a priest at some time. But for now the priests that we have come through here every week are awfully pressed for time. I can't seem to ask any of them to devote any more of their time just to me.
Still, I think if I can stick strictly to the text of the manuals without coming up with my own interpolations and get out of it even a most basic understanding I should be far more advanced than I was. Coming from the Novus Ordo I never knew anyone who ever spent any time in the manuals. So even a basic understanding would be better than where I came from.

Quote:
Wilhelm & Scannell, "Manual of Catholic Theology"
Hunter, S.J. "Outlines of Dogmatic Theology"
Van Noort, "Dogmatic Theology"
Pohl-Preuss, "Dogmatic Theology"
Berry, "The Church"
Mura, "The Nature of the Mystical Body"
Glenn, "Apologetics" (plus his series on various branches of philosophy is invaluable)
The papal encyclicals
St. Thomas, "Summa Theologica" - transl. by the Fathers of the English Dominican Province


Thank You


Tue Sep 04, 2007 12:45 am
Profile

Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 1:54 am
Posts: 147
New post 
John Lane wrote:
Ideally, you'd find a teacher to guide you through the study of such matters. Any priest might agree to an hour or two a week if you showed yourself docile and enthusiastic. Even a very average priest, intellectually speaking, would be better than a complete self-teaching exercise.

Wilhelm & Scannell, "Manual of Catholic Theology"
Hunter, S.J. "Outlines of Dogmatic Theology"
Van Noort, "Dogmatic Theology"
Pohl-Preuss, "Dogmatic Theology"
Berry, "The Church"
Mura, "The Nature of the Mystical Body"
Glenn, "Apologetics" (plus his series on various branches of philosophy is invaluable)
The papal encyclicals
St. Thomas, "Summa Theologica" - transl. by the Fathers of the English Dominican Province


I still plan on searching for a hardcopy. But the novus ordo site http://www.newadvent.org/summa/2.htm has the summa there and gives this info:

The Summa Theologica of St. Thomas Aquinas
Second and Revised Edition, 1920
Literally translated by Fathers of the English Dominican Province
Online Edition Copyright © 2006 by Kevin Knight
Nihil Obstat. F. Innocentius Apap, O.P., S.T.M., Censor. Theol.
Imprimatur. Edus. Canonicus Surmont, Vicarius Generalis. Westmonasterii.
APPROBATIO ORDINIS
Nihil Obstat. F. Raphael Moss, O.P., S.T.L. and F. Leo Moore, O.P., S.T.L.
Imprimatur. F. Beda Jarrett, O.P., S.T.L., A.M., Prior Provincialis Angliæ

MARIÆ IMMACULATÆ - SEDI SAPIENTIÆ


Tue Sep 04, 2007 6:30 am
Profile

Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2007 3:42 am
Posts: 740
Location: Moscow, Idaho, U.S.A.
New post Books
Colin:

I will check with my friends, the Catholic book-sellers, in Wisconsin for these, and will let you and the forum know of what they have and their prices.

_________________
Kenneth G. Gordon CinC
Moscow, Idaho
U.S.A.


Tue Sep 04, 2007 7:20 pm
Profile E-mail
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Yahoo [Bot] and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group.
Designed by Vjacheslav Trushkin for Free Forums/DivisionCore.